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Common errors > more  determiner, (also pronoun, adv)

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Incorrect or non-standard usage, overuse etc.

I want to buy a house so I need to save more money.
You should eat more fresh vegetables if you want to be healthy.
 

The problem

These sentences are both correct if the speaker means more money than I save now, or more vegetables than you eat now.
However, they are often misused when the speaker means a large quantity of something.

Remember, more is not an absolute quantity. It is only used for making comparisons. more money does not necessarily mean a lot of money.
If I have ten dollars and you have five, I have more money than you; I do not have a lot of money.

Standard English

When you want to speak of an absolute quantity, use: a lot of, a great deal of, many etc:

I want to buy a house so I need to save a lot of money.
You should eat plenty of fresh vegetables if you want to be healthy.


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